Episode 14: The Wind Is Blowing, And We’re Still Towing

In this episode, The Wind Is Blowing, And We’re Still Towing, we welcomed Adrien Benoit, VP of Elite Service Recovery & Towing in Lake Charles, LA. Adrien, along with his wife, Megan, run, operate, and own a flourishing towing business despite having been through many ups and downs over the years including a few major hurricanes. Despite all that, they encourage and help their entire staff maintain a work/life balance, as well as build a clear path for all employees who wish to advance their career in towing. Click play to listen.

Shelli Hawkins:

Welcome back, everybody, to TRAXERO On-The-Go podcast. We are here. We are excited to be here. It is Episode 14. Laura Dolan, are you in the house, and can you believe it’s Episode 14?

Laura Dolan:

I’m Laura Dolan, and I’m in the house.

Shelli Hawkins:

I love that. That’s fantastic. It seems just like yesterday we had Episode 1. Pop quiz, who was on Episode 1? And if you get this wrong, you’ll be in deep trouble.

Laura Dolan:

Are you asking me or our guest? No, I know you’re asking me. Jeff Poquette and Brad McIntosh.

Shelli Hawkins:

Outstanding.

Laura Dolan:

From their podcast, the Tow Business Podcast.

Shelli Hawkins:

That’s right.

Laura Dolan:

Because there’s No Business Like Tow Business.

Shelli Hawkins:

Oh, I love that you even remember that.

Laura Dolan:

Oh, yeah. It’s so catchy. I was like, “That is clever as heck.” So…

Shelli Hawkins:

I’m going to wager that Brad McIntosh came up with that. I’m not saying Jeff Poquette is not creative, but we’ll see.

Laura Dolan:

He may be coming after you after this, so I’d be careful.

Shelli Hawkins:

I think he probably will. But yeah, that was our very first one. And here where you are at Episode 14. We have got a very amazing guest today. We’ll introduce him a little bit later. But in the meantime, Laura, how in the world are things going for you in the beautiful city of Columbus, Ohio? Have you got the snow you’ve wanted?

Laura Dolan:

Unfortunately, no. And we are in a little bit of a, I don’t want to call it a heat wave, but a warming trend. We were going to be in the forties and fifties for the next couple of weeks, so unfortunately no snow, but things may change. You never know. But my winter’s going great. Over the weekend I attended, let’s see, how do I put this in terms that our audience will understand? So I sing barbershop. I’m part of the Sweet Adelines International organization where it’s all women singing barbershop harmony, and we did our Region 17 Harmony Weekend up in Independence, Ohio, and it was so much fun. We split into three different choruses. I was in the red chorus. We all learned the same song, and then we all had to give our own interpretations of how the song would be presented, and it was so much fun. My husband is a director, so he got to go. We had a few coaching sessions, a bunch of rehearsals. It was a jam packed… Thankfully, it’s only two days because you are absolutely drained by the time it’s over, but it is so much fun.

Shelli Hawkins:

I can only imagine. Standing, singing, performing, all the emotions.

Laura Dolan:

It went so fast though. It was like before you knew it we were on our way back yesterday, but it was so much fun. And yeah, it was definitely a good time. And I know… We’re in the middle of a water challenge here at TRAXERO. We do these really fun challenges, wellness challenges here every month. Shelli is on the Culture Squad. Shelli, if you want to tell them a little bit more about that and how that all works.

Shelli Hawkins:

You bet. So every month we have a wellness challenge focused on different topics. It can be movement, it could be nutrition, doing acts of kindness, something great. And then we put the challenge forth three times a week or the wellness challenge for the water challenges. You set your own goal for the water you want to consume in a day. And then we’ve got a big spreadsheet that we all share. And your goal is whatever you want your goal to be. And hit the goal and post some encouraging messages up in the Slack channel. So I think it’s going really well. I am amazed at how many, I’m not amazed. I’m absolutely not amazed at how many Stanley cups are out there. For real, every flavor of the rainbow of Stanley Cup.

Laura Dolan:

I don’t have a Stanley Cup, I’m a Yeti girl. Is that weird to say?

Shelli Hawkins:

No, absolutely.

Laura Dolan:

And we are competing for a Traxero Yeti big old thermos, the biggest cup you can get. And I’m very excited. Was it like 65 ounces of water you could fit in that thing or something?

Shelli Hawkins:

And the great thing is Rene and I recently downsized. We are very minimalistic people with physical possessions. We got rid of so many coffee mugs. I made him get rid of his Boba Fett coffee mug.

Laura Dolan:

What?

Shelli Hawkins:

And so… Well, listen-

Laura Dolan:

That’s sacrilege.

Shelli Hawkins:

I got rid of stuff too. Well, here I get a shipment of the little TRAXERO mug that I wanted and now I’m going to get this one and he’s going to be like, “Really? Really?”

Laura Dolan:

Yeah.

Shelli Hawkins:

“You do not need another one.” I’ll say, I’m like, “There’s only two of us. What do we need 30 coffee mugs for?”

Laura Dolan:

That’s a good point.

Shelli Hawkins:

Anyway.

Laura Dolan:

Yeah, my husband and I, we were… There’s a little boutique at the event over the weekend and they had this really cool water bottle, and my husband’s like, “Do we really need another water bottle?” You saw the collection I posted in Slack the other day, Shelli, we have so many water bottles. And I’m like, “You’re right. We don’t need another one.” And I’m about to get another one from TRAXERO.

Shelli Hawkins:

Before it’s all over with, I’m going to ask everyone to share their bottle collections. I’m a fan of Swell. Have you ever seen the brand Swell? I have several of those bottles. And once I say this, it’s going to be in all your algorithms. So hop on Instagram after listening to the podcast and you’ll see all the bottles from Swell. Rene and I had a great weekend. The highlight of… Should I say his weekend, probably? I look at him and say, “Baby, would you like to walk to the mall and get some Popeye’s?” Which to our guest,

Laura Dolan:

Yes, please.

Shelli Hawkins:

Would probably be just like absolute blasphemy. Right? And so we ended up going for the Chipotle route. So that was the highlight of the weekend.

Laura Dolan:

Oh. We had Chipotle too.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yeah, I love it.

Laura Dolan:

My husband’s favorite.

Shelli Hawkins:

Without further ado, we are going to bring on our guest. We’re super excited today to have Mr. Adrien Benoit from Elite Service Recovery and Towing. Adrien, come on-

Adrien Benoit:

Hey Shelli.

Shelli Hawkins:

Come on in. Hey, how are you sir?

Adrien Benoit:

Good. How are you? Thank you so much for having me on the show. Shelli and Laura, thank you all so much.

Laura Dolan:

Thank you, Adrien.

Adrien Benoit:

It’s an honor to be on the TRAXERO podcast.

Laura Dolan:

Thanks so much.

Shelli Hawkins:

We’re excited. Yes. I cannot wait. I’ve got a million questions for you, Adrien, because I’m absolutely fascinated by so many parts of your business. But let’s just do a simple introduction. How did you get into towing? What does it look like today? Where do you live and all the things?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, absolutely. So one of the big things about me is I’m a guy who loves challenges, and what industry better to get into than the towing industry, which is full of them every single day. So me and my wife, Megan, we run, operate, and own Elite Service Recovery and Towing. I am a big believer in a work and home life balance. So I try to implement that in our business as much as possible. And I believe that’s really what’s helped to make us so successful. We have three kids, one daughter, two boys. We’re getting into driving here pretty soon, so that’s going to be real interesting.

Laura Dolan:

Oh, boy.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah.

Laura Dolan:

Yeah. Those are fun ages.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. It’s going to be real interesting. But really it keeps us super busy with our three kids. They’re into activities. We got dance, we got baseball, we got soccer. So being able to build that work home life balance was super important to us. So not just for us but for our whole business. So we really implement that a lot. And we’ll talk about that I guess a little later. The strategies that we use to help with employee retention.

Shelli Hawkins:

I was just sitting here thinking about the dynamic. Normally it’s the guy sees the girl and he owns the towing company, and he’s all starstruck and she and they start dating and marriage and whatever, and he’s got the towing business and she has no idea what she’s getting into. But it’s really the reverse for you guys, right?

Adrien Benoit:

It is. Absolutely.

Shelli Hawkins:

I want you to unpack that. Unpack that for me right now.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. So we met in high school and we stuck together. We’re high school sweethearts. About the year 2003, she joined the company. Her dad owned the company. She had to have a couple other jobs right before she come to work for family, which is great. But she came to work at the establishment, and it wasn’t until 2006 that I came into the picture full-time, had to be 21 to be able to get on the insurance. But in 2005 I was riding along with the drivers, kind of learning the nature of the business, how things go, and really got super involved and intrigued with how everything operated. So it kind of got into me then and I kind of stuck with it since then.

Shelli Hawkins:

I love it. What types of jobs did you have before towing?

Adrien Benoit:

A lot of customer service jobs, which really led me to-

Shelli Hawkins:

Interesting.

Adrien Benoit:

Towing is just extreme customer service, right?

Shelli Hawkins:

Yeah.

Laura Dolan:

Yes.

Adrien Benoit:

Anybody can go buy tow trucks and tow cars, but it’s what you’re delivering with that tow.

Shelli Hawkins:

You are a hundred percent correct.

Laura Dolan:

Absolutely. Yeah.

Shelli Hawkins:

I love that. You said the business was started what year or do we talk about that, the history of the business a little bit?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, so Elite was started in ’98 by Robert Darscheid, Megan’s dad. He started with one heavy truck. He loved the heavy industry. He wasn’t sold on the light duty industry. So he started at another competitor in town, worked his way from light duty up into heavy duty, and that’s what he just grew to love. So that company was having some issues internally. So he decided that he wanted to branch out and start his own. So he did. He bought one heavy truck and then it evolved into two heavy trucks. A funny story here, the kicker of him getting into the light duty side of things was… In the state of Louisiana, they have some requirements, what allows you to be on the rotation list. And for the heavy side, you have to have a light duty record to be on the heavy rotation list.

Shelli Hawkins:

Interesting.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, so it was [wild]. So he’s on the rotation list for a couple of weeks. The other companies in town start to catch wind of it, and they’re down complaining. The first thing they’re complaining about is him not having a light duty truck to be on the rotation list. So what’s the man do? He goes and gets a light duty tow truck, and now he is a competitor on the light duty side of the industry. So they basically forced him into the light duty side of things.

Shelli Hawkins:

That is… Sometimes you just don’t think, you don’t think it all the way through.

Adrien Benoit:

Right.

Shelli Hawkins:

What’s going to happen. And I can just see… I’ve never met this man before. I can see, “You want me to get a light duty truck? I will get a light duty truck.”

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. They created more competition for themselves just out of remorse that they didn’t want him on the heavy side of the list. He had already had the big investments, so it’s not like he wasn’t going to go out and invest a smaller amount of money to continue doing what he was doing, but they kind of just forced his hand. So that was the nature of it. So that’s how he got started on the light duty side too.

Shelli Hawkins:

And it’s grown exponentially to what it is today. Are you folks servicing mainly commercial customers? Are you doing law enforcement type work?

Adrien Benoit:

So all of it. So we do commercial accounts, we do law enforcement towing, and we also aim for just, what we call a COD, our cash customer. So that is also a big impact on our business as far as the style towing we do. We are constantly pushing out social media, search engine optimization, doing things on Google to try to be the first one on the list whenever somebody’s broke down and needs service.

Laura Dolan:

That is incredible. Coming from a marketing background, I love hearing that, that towing businesses are getting more into the digital side of things and relying on Google Ads and Google Screened, which is a new type of technology out there. We just talked about that with Jesse Lubar from OMG Tow Marketing last week. So yeah, that’s so good to hear. Adrien, I’m curious, so how many trucks do you have now or how many pieces of equipment?

Adrien Benoit:

So we have around 28 pieces of equipment in the fleet, ranging from heavy duties, light duties, rollbacks, small wreckers. We also do transport as well, so we transport equipment.

Shelli Hawkins:

I was going to ask about that.

Adrien Benoit:

Yep. We have five transport trucks in the fleet, a couple of land alls and a low boy. But we also do major recovery work. We also do off-road recoveries. We have a skidsteer with the winch box. So really we pride ourselves in being the go-to company in the area. If you call, we’re trying to find a solution to your problem.

Shelli Hawkins:

I love it. Laura recently discovered what a skidsteer with a winch box. She’s like, “what is this thing?” We were in Tennessee. “What does this even do? This looks like…”

Laura Dolan:

The one that had the joker on it?

Shelli Hawkins:

Yes. Yes.

Laura Dolan:

I’m like, “This thing’s cool.”

Shelli Hawkins:

So I’m scrolling trying to find pictures of offroad in the farmer’s fields, down the whatever, trying to show her.

Laura Dolan:

Yeah, you were all literally explaining that to me in the booth. That was funny. How many locations do you have, Adrien?

Adrien Benoit:

We have two locations. One in the Lake Charles area and then one in the Sulphur area. Sulphur, Louisiana area. It’s probably about 10 miles apart from each other.

Laura Dolan:

Oh wow.

Adrien Benoit:

Real easy to manage. Yeah. Real easy to manage. It put us on a couple of additional rotation lists for police departments and it helped us service… We’re divided by a big bridge, so it also helped us service each side of the bridge, the east and the west side. So we kind of stage units at both yards. We will pull units from one yard if we need additional support at the other one, things like that. It’s real easy to logistically handle.

Laura Dolan:

And how many employees do you have?

Adrien Benoit:

So we have around 36 employees total at the company.

Shelli Hawkins:

That’s plenty. That’s plenty. I can only imagine.

Adrien Benoit:

Yes.

Shelli Hawkins:

And the longer that you’re in towing, the more you’ll recognize, that’s an O’Hare towing truck. That’s a So-and-So truck, that’s a Michael Bigg’s truck. We all know the signs and everyone-

Laura Dolan:

Recognize the branding.

Shelli Hawkins:

Everyone in the industry knows Mr. Adrien Benoit and Elite for his red NRCs. So I want to know, are all of your tow trucks, in the fleet, NRC?

Adrien Benoit:

No.

Shelli Hawkins:

Do you want us to erase this out? You don’t have to. It’s controversial.

Adrien Benoit:

No, it’s okay. It’s okay.

Shelli Hawkins:

Fine.

Laura Dolan:

Are you sure?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. Yeah. I’m sure. Maybe the other guys would call me. Right?

Shelli Hawkins:

Of all of those beautiful red tow trucks that we know Elite service for in Lake Charles, Louisiana, are they all NRC, Mr. Benoit?

Adrien Benoit:

They are not. A lot of them are. So I know, right? A lot of them are, but we have had to buy additional units in the last couple of years to help keep up with demand. So it comes to one of those supply issues. What’s available at the time? What’s the colors? Because I refuse to buy anything other than a red tow truck. I’ve done it before. I bought a white one and it’s like I hated that truck the entire time it was in the fleet because it was just white. We can paint it, but it’s tough.

Laura Dolan:

Or you can wrap it.

Adrien Benoit:

But I’m a red tow truck kind of guy. Yeah, you can wrap it. But I like to paint.

Shelli Hawkins:

He knows the soul. He knows he soul.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. But no, we do have a couple of other units in the fleet. So we have a couple of JerrDans and we do have a Miller unit in the fleet. So we got all the top contenders in the fleet right now.

Shelli Hawkins:

Are they making money for you? That’s really what matters. Are they operational? Are they making money for you?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, exactly. If we want to better serve our community and our customers, we got to have the equipment to do it. So it doesn’t matter what name’s on the side of it, just as long as it operates and it can get the job done.

Shelli Hawkins:

That must be fascinating for your operators if they have to go between brands. Because I’m very familiar with… Rene was all Miller and JerrDan, and then he worked for Danny Williams for a year and a half in Dodge City, all NRCs. Right? And he’s like, “Wait a minute, this is different. But it’s kind of cool. I really like it. Let’s learn all about this.”

Laura Dolan:

Can I ask really quick what the difference is, or is that a whole other discussion?

Shelli Hawkins:

Can I…

Laura Dolan:

Maybe we won’t touch that today.

Shelli Hawkins:

Okay, Laura, I’ll take a stab at it, Adrien. You let me know. I’m going to try to be super neutral about it. NRC is a brand based out of Canada. Miller Industries is based out of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and JerrDan is a brand based only an hour north of me here in Greencastle, Pennsylvania. They all have their history in the wrecker industry and how they came about, how they develop different brands that they purchased, etc. And so a lot of that has to do with the environment that you’re in. And being in Canada, it is a much harsher environment than we experience anywhere else. And so in my opinion, it seems like these trucks are… How would you describe it? They have more like a crane type platform as far as the handles winching in winching out kind of thing. It is not necessarily like which one is better, but more which is suited for you. And what is your closest distributor that can service you and help you? I don’t know. Is that? Did I? How did I? How did I do?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, I’m going to agree with you a hundred percent. So whenever I joined the company, that’s all there was, was NRC. So that’s really what I grew up learning and loving. So we kind of just stuck with the trend as we grew. We always found NRC to be our best friend because we were familiar with it. Not only with the operations and controls, but issues. We’ve run into issues. We know how to repair them, we know the system. So it just makes us easier as a company to repair this unit, get it back up in service. So that’s kind of the trend that we went on as far as equipment we bought. We always felt that it was fair marketed as far as pricing. We felt like the quality was good on the product, so we didn’t really have a reason to change.

Shelli Hawkins:

Oh, it makes sense. It’s what you get used to.

Laura Dolan:

Stick with what works. Of course.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. But on the other thing, as far as the operations, they all operate differently. The controls are different on rollback. So you get an NRC rollback versus a JerrDan or a Miller rollback, and the control handles are different. Down is up, up is down and then vice versa. So if I got to go jump into a truck real quick, I always got to look at the control panel and read it, make sure I’m going to push the handle the right way, otherwise it could get ugly.

Laura Dolan:

So it sounds to me it’s like going from a PC to a Mac.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah.

Laura Dolan:

You just have to get used to it.

Adrien Benoit:

Exactly.

Shelli Hawkins:

That is a fantastic… That is excellent, Laura.

Laura Dolan:

Because you were saying things are up, up is down, down is up. And it’s like when I went from a PC to a Mac, the controls are on the left on the Mac and on the right on a PC and it’s like whoa, this is very different. But for some reason that popped in my head.

Shelli Hawkins:

No, I love it. It is applicable to us today, for sure. I’m always fascinated by the diverse environments that our towers work in. If it is densely saturated interstates. I live in Columbia, Maryland, a little bit north of Washington, D.C. and on up to New York. I could be in New York in three hours if there was no traffic, but as you know, that does not exist. So towing up here is very different. When you go out to Colorado and out west, you are towing with canyons, rocks, all the things. Mr. Benoit, I would love for you to talk about what is it like to tow where you are? I look on the map and you’re close to the Texas border-ish, and you are on the water, close to it anyway.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, yep, absolutely right. So we are 30 miles from the Texas, Louisiana line. We are along the I-10 corridor and believe it or not, our traffic is not bad at all. So I can be from here to the Texas line and probably 30 minutes. So our traffic situation around Lake Charles and Sulphur area is amazing compared to the bigger cities, and our city traffic is starting to get a little thicker. The roads are definitely starting to show their age. But as far as all in all our traffic itself, I can be to work in eight minutes every morning.

Laura Dolan:

Oh nice.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yeah.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. It makes it really nice.

Laura Dolan:

I work from home now, but I never had that situation. I grew up in Southern California and I used to commute like an hour each way every day. I don’t miss that.

Shelli Hawkins:

No, not at all. When you said it took you 30 minutes, I feel like your wife is on the other side of the desk looking at you like, “Oh no, it takes you a lot less time than that. I’m pretty sure.”

Adrien Benoit:

Probably so.

Shelli Hawkins:

You are fibbing. My mom would say.

Adrien Benoit:

Normal driving conditions.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yes. Where we are perfectly behaved in our driving behavior. I love all of this. So do you do a lot of water recoveries? Are you guys equipped for diving? What are things that you encounter that someone in the middle of America would not?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, we do our fair share of water recoveries. We will get a couple a year, somebody launching a boat, different scenarios of what happened, but sometimes their truck will end up on the water with their boat. So we’ll have to go in and get their vehicle out. We do have a couple of beaches in the area. From time to time they’ll pull out on the beach, get stuck, high tide come in, flood the vehicle out. So we do get them scenarios all around the year a couple of times.

Shelli Hawkins:

I love that.

Adrien Benoit:

Yes. As far as diving, so I am a certified diver and I used to dive for vehicles when I was a little younger. Right?

Laura Dolan:

Oh wow.

Adrien Benoit:

But the diving aspect of it to me was just not enough to keep my training up. So I’m still certified. I don’t trust myself and my equipment if I’m only going to use it once or twice a year. So it’s just easier for me to hire in some trained divers that do it normally. Usually some guys from the sheriff’s office. They have great equipment. They have… All their stuff’s up-to-date. So them guys can get in and get it done. It’s kind of like I do towing and I’ll let you do the diving.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yeah, hire a professional and let them do your thing.

Adrien Benoit:

Hire a professional.

Shelli Hawkins:

Right?

Adrien Benoit:

Absolutely.

Shelli Hawkins:

When Rene would go to a scene of a recovery, have you ever seen… Especially like an owner operator of a tractor, like “Don’t touch this, don’t do this, she can’t do this, this is my tractor.” Rene would say, “You’ve done your job and now let me come in and do my job the same way.”

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. Especially when I know when I drove heavy duty, it was mainly the operators would just follow you around and watch every little thing you were doing. And like you said, it’s like, “Hey, let me do what I got to do and get out of here.”

Shelli Hawkins:

I love it. I can only imagine the complex recoveries that you guys get into. Anything on the top of your mind in the last six months of a super complex recovery that you guys had to handle. “Let me tell you the story about this one.” There has to be one.

Adrien Benoit:

We do quite a bit of recovery work in our area as far as one that just tops my list in the last six months.

Shelli Hawkins:

Or a year.

Adrien Benoit:

I don’t… I have in a year. Yeah. A year. So probably it was last summer, we did a crane that rolled over. It was a big crane, weighed about 177,000 pounds on six wheel… On six axles. I’m sorry. Run off the interstates. It was in a construction zone, which made it even tougher. Run off the interstate, turned over on its side. It was on a unlevel embankment. So yeah, that made the recovery that much tougher. We had to move construction barriers, we had to bring in five heavy wreckers. We put three on the downside and we put two up on the top side and we brought it back up and brought it back to the road. And then getting it out of there was a chore itself as well, because it didn’t have any power, didn’t have any steering. So towing something that big was a task as well. But yeah, that was so not only was it a complex job with a lot of weights, a lot of moving pieces, five trucks working together in sequence to bring this thing back up, but it was like 110 degrees outside.

Laura Dolan:

That makes things so much easier.

Adrien Benoit:

Right. And we’re on blacktop, and as we’re working… And this isn’t just a little two, three hour job, so we’re out there for 14, 15 hours, and the blacktop is just getting hot. My guys are getting exhausted, we’re drinking plenty of water. But at some point I think that just really stops helping. I think that was probably the toughest thing to overcome, was the heat and just the fatigue.

Shelli Hawkins:

Your brain is not working. We can learn all the Rackmaster, West Wilburn we want to, but when the brain is not functioning, you got problems.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, you got big problems. So I think that’s one of the biggest things and the toughest things that we face in my area is just the hot temperature. I joke about it, but I tell everybody it’s like you walk outside and you get punched in the face by a microwave.

Shelli Hawkins:

Oh gosh. Yeah. Oh, I never thought about that. Walking into a sauna. Wow.

Laura Dolan:

I used to live in Phoenix, I would say getting hit in the face with a blow-dryer, especially if it was windy.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yeah. Wow.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. And it’s tough. I’ve had an operator from New York come down here and he’s a heavy operator and I didn’t think he was going to make it at first, the first summer he was here. It was tough for him, really tough to keep up. You step out the truck and you’re just sweating. You’re trying to keep up with fluids and it’s tough. But he overcame and he is still with us today, so that’s awesome. But it’s a whole new environment.

Shelli Hawkins:

It really is. So I saw you at the Tow Summit last year in San Diego. Was that your first Tow Summit to attend or have you gone to all of them?

Adrien Benoit:

No, I haven’t made it to all of them. I wish I had. But sometimes our schedules don’t quite align. So I’ve been to, I think that was our third or fourth Tow Summit to attend. We did New Orleans when it was in New Orleans. That was our first one and that’s what really kicked it off for us. It was kind of close, so it was easy to get to. We’re only three hours from New Orleans, so we attended that one and it was, “Man, this is awesome.” Some really great information. And then from there we’ve tried to make everyone that we could. It’s a wealth of knowledge for anybody that’s never been. A lot of great people that attend. If you don’t learn anything from the classes, which you should because I do every year, you’ll learn stuff from just sitting in a conversation.

Shelli Hawkins:

Exactly. There was the summit, and the reason why I ask this question is I want to talk about the culture of the company here in a second to tee up what we’re going to talk about. But for those of you that are curious about the Tow Summit, the website is just towsummit.com and it is going to be in the home state of the folks that run it Florida, in the city of Fort Lauderdale. So you can take a look and check that out. But it really… For those that have been there last year, it was on the West Coast for the first time. So there was a lot of folks that had attended it that never had attended it before. And it was just… I had one friend tell me, I found my people. I will be coming to this every single year no matter where it is.

My friend JR Cady said that from Ten-West Towing. He was just asking me, he’s like, “Does this happen every year? Yes, yes it does, JR. So come on back for the next one.” And I gave him those dates when they came out. But to me, when I see the folks that go the extra mile and go to conferences like this, they are seeking to make their business better, to make the business more profitable, but to also give their employees a great culture to work in. And when I think about that, Adrien, you are at the top of the mind when it comes to all those things. So talk about what has happened in the company and how you’ve changed it, and what does it look like today to be an employee of Elite?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, so I think one of the biggest things that’s helped me out through the years was actually being in the driver’s seat. So I didn’t just come into the company and jump straight into running the show. I started out in a light duty truck running light duty calls, and then worked my way into getting a CDL, climbing into a heavy wrecker, learning the heavy wrecker side of the business, worked hard to get a transportation truck in the fleet and then figured out the transportation side of things. So if we’re talking about what has really helped me through the years to be able to figure out what makes this thing tick better, I think it’s actually being in the driver’s seat of the truck for so long, and then coming in to manage this side of things where it’s more the paperwork, more the logistics and dispatching.

But I still understand what needs to happen out in the field and how these guys feel, what’s going on in the conditions and environment and places that they are. So I think that has really helped me to build a great culture in the company. Another thing that I’ve found is to be able to keep great staff, great employees, we need to be able to give them some home time. We are moving out of the era of the guys that just want to work constantly 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Even if they tell you they do, they don’t. I promise. I’ve heard that a lot and it’s not true. Them guys will get burned out and they’re gone in six months. Right.

Laura Dolan:

Wow.

Adrien Benoit:

It’s true. It’s true. They’ll tell me that. They’ll tell me, “Boss, I’m good, I’m good, I’m good. Just run me. I want to make some money.” Which is great. But then six months down the road you’re looking for another guy to fill the seat of that truck.

Laura Dolan:

Yeah, it’s just a great way to get burned out.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, it is. And we’ve seen that over the year, a revolving door because of that reason. So over the last couple of years we’ve worked hard to build a culture where we’re adding more employees, different shifts, so that when some of these guys… A lot of these guys get off at the end of their shift, they go home, they have time with their family, they take a shower and they don’t come back in until the beginning of their next shift. And I believe that’s really helped us establish career-driven employees, along with benefits and good pay. But I think that’s a big driver in today’s industry as well, as far as keeping employees.

Shelli Hawkins:

That is fantastic you can do that, and schedule their time. Because it’s predictable and they can show up for the basketball games, for the ballets, for whatever the whole family has going on. I know a lot of folks are really heavily into sports, whether it’s baseball, wrestling, football, whatever for the kids to keep them active, to keep them going. So I love that you have prioritized that for them. It’s kind of like figuring out, “Hey, if my people are not exhausted from working 24/7, maybe they’ll stay longer.”

Adrien Benoit:

Yep. And that’s not the only thing. You start talking about fatigue and then you start worrying about the next accident that’s going to happen in your company. Right? Fatigue driving is one of the big things, or attitude, right? It is not just because they want to have a bad attitude, but they’re tired, they’re wore out. That could create damage to a customer’s vehicle, different things like that. So I think it creates a more positive environment around the company.

Laura Dolan:

For sure. And to be able to have a work-life balance in this type of industry, you don’t think that it’s possible, but it sounds like the right amount of employees and the flexibility and setting schedules and things like that. I’m sure things come up where people have to get called in once in a while, but it sounds like, for the most part, people can have a normal schedule, a normal routine, catch up on sleep, catch up on eating, things like that. So that’s really amazing. That’s very healthy and I commend you for that.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, thank you. And listen, it wasn’t a one-stop shop kind of deal, right? There was a lot of failures involved with it. There’s still adjustments today. If somebody leaves us for whatever reason and we don’t feel like that shift was working out like we wanted it to, there’s modifications. Nothing’s wrote in stone. So it’s all adjustments to what benefits and helps us try to keep what we have going, the culture we’re trying to build. It just, it helps.

Shelli Hawkins:

That’s fantastic. I don’t know how many times I’ve said fantastic so far. I’m sure someone is out there counting. That’s the word that I say that it just comes out, Adrien. It just happens. That being said-

Adrien Benoit:

That’s fantastic.

Shelli Hawkins:

It is fantastic. It is fantastic.

Laura Dolan:

Here we go.

Shelli Hawkins:

We were going to make a drinking game out of it one time, but then we decided not to.

Laura Dolan:

Yeah, because you would die.

Shelli Hawkins:

So I am a person, I want to be a light duty driver for you. I get my CDL, whatever you require me have. What is the growth progress for me as an employee in your company? What does that look like?

Adrien Benoit:

So right now, whenever we start somebody out, we’re looking for shift guys, mainly, for our light duty side. And what that would entail would be you have a great attitude, you come in presentable, on time, as far as… Whenever we’re doing the hiring process, we do either one or two interviews with you. If we feel like you’re a great fit for the company, we hire you in, bring you in, we’ll do two to three weeks of training with you, riding along with another one of our drivers. We have a checklist that they have to go down and fill out at the end of the training. As long as the trainer and the trainee both feel like they’re ready, then we cut them loose to start their shift. And then from there, just as they grow, there’s always opportunity for advancement into the bigger trucks.

Shelli Hawkins:

Do you have employees coming to you and saying, “Hey, I want to be in that truck, I want to be in the rotator, I want to be in the 50 ton heavy,” whatever the case may be. And then do you give them just like a path to get there?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, it happens. Not as much as I want it to, but it does happen. We absolutely do, we’ll provide them training, we’ll get them out on additional jobs with the drivers that are in them units, or we’ll get them out to heavy recovery scenes so they can learn more. So we absolutely build a path for them to advance their career here.

Shelli Hawkins:

That is awesome. I love that, because I know that there are a lot of folks out there that do they want to stay in a rollback? Some people do, and that’s wonderful. I’m going to ask a quick question while we’re here. We learned a couple of podcasts ago that a creative way of sliding a vehicle up onto the rollback bed that’s locked down, no power, nothing. We call it a brick, for an EV, etc., but it can’t move. Are you a man that uses Dawn Dishwashing liquid or do you use the trays for McDonald’s?

Adrien Benoit:

Well, Rackmaster makes some really cool skates.

Shelli Hawkins:

I was going to say he does skates. I’m sure you’re doing skates today, but what did you do, Adrien?

Adrien Benoit:

The McDonald’s tray sounds kind of cool, but yeah, and they’re free. Right?

Shelli Hawkins:

Right.

Adrien Benoit:

Just got to order a meal. Right?

Laura Dolan:

Well, Much to McDonald’s chagrin, I’m sure they don’t want you taking their trays, but sure.

Shelli Hawkins:

License plates. We’re going to trick, we’re going to pinch. So I don’t know if you had a preference, but you’re sticking with the skates apparently.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. I always liked the skate method, and I got some guys in the company that they like to use the Dawn dishwasher soap and water technique, spray it down on the bed. But I’ve always been a believer in the skates. They’ve always worked well for me. I think we’re starting to get to a point now with a lot of the newer vehicles, electric vehicles, it is going to be more about evolving into how to use the product too. So it’s not just going to be hammered under the wheel, hammer the skate under the wheel with a hammer. We’re going to actually have to jack these vehicles up, place them under the wheel, set them back down. That way we know we get no movement out of the wheel that can destroy anything in the motor there. So I think things are going to get a little trickier as they start to advance. I hope not, but I think that’s the trend that’s happening.

Shelli Hawkins:

No, you’re absolutely right. Two podcasts ago we talked about that and how crucial it is for the OEMs to effectively communicate to the towers that are making these more complex vehicles so they don’t do something bad to them to destroy them. For sure.

Laura Dolan:

I want to switch gears here and talk about, circle back to how you run your business, Adrien, and I just want to talk about maybe some of the technology that you use today. Have you embraced some new technology? Are you an early adopter? Talk us through what you’ve adopted over the years and what you have now.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, so we are a big believer in technology. I am a believer in early adopting of technology. I want to see how much I can use it before I break it. I want to email the developers every single day and tell them my problems.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yes.

Adrien Benoit:

But no, I believe we are an early adapter in technology. And we use InTow for our software here at Elite Service. I’m always emailing Dennis and Ted over there about ideas that I have or things that I think we could do to be real beneficial in the towing software. Just one of the things that I email them about regular is, when we dispatch a call to a customer, the driver goes in route, the customer gets a text message letting them know that our operator’s on their way. I tell Dennis and Ted, I’m like, ” Hey, we need to put a picture with a bio of the operator going out there. That way the customer knows who’s coming.” Yeah, it is just that at ease feeling, right? The glass company does it. Why can’t we?

Laura Dolan:

Right. Yeah.

Shelli Hawkins:

That’s an awesome idea.

Adrien Benoit:

So I’m always on them. I’m like, “Man, this would be a great idea. And if you have a customer that’s in a bad area or they’re scared, that helps them feel better about everything going on.” The driver arrives. It’s exactly who the picture showed. So it’s just one more thing that we can do to separate ourselves.

Shelli Hawkins:

Ideas like that is exactly how products evolve, change, get better. That’s something that can be widely used across all people using software. That’s a great idea. I really like it. Are there any other platforms that you’re currently an early adopter of, Adrien?

Adrien Benoit:

So we invested in Beacon pretty early right when it was first available for us. I love Beacon just because it’s an easy button, especially here in Louisiana, being able to get ORSV back pretty quick. That way we have all the ownership information right away. We don’t have to go out to the cars to hunt down registrations, all that good stuff. But as far as technology, we have a lot of technology that we use in our company as far as Samsara for our camera systems, helps us monitor things going on, helps keep us protected. We have a fleet maintenance program to maintain our fleet. We have two mechanics, two full-time mechanics in the company that do nothing but work on our trucks. So we implemented a fleet program for that. It’s called Fleetio. Very good product there. Yeah. And it is mobile too. It’s an app as well. So it really helps keep track of things and lets me take a glance inside to make sure everything’s going well also.

Shelli Hawkins:

I love it. All those things. We hear about technology that’s new. We heard about one not too long ago called Whip Around. It is a pre-trip app. Have you seen this?

Adrien Benoit:

I haven’t seen it. I heard of it.

Shelli Hawkins:

And then there’s another one that they use to remotely air up the heavy or the rotator. Have you seen this one too?

Adrien Benoit:

I heard of that one as well.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yeah. Yeah. So the folks at Interstate up in Chicopee, Massachusetts use both of those, and some other friends. Glenn’s Towing over in Green Bay, the inventor and maker of the large dollies. Have you seen those?

Adrien Benoit:

Yes.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yes. I was on their property not too long ago because my brother lives up in Green Bay, so they were showing me the remote airing up system just via your app. I thought that was great.

Adrien Benoit:

That is awesome.

Shelli Hawkins:

I almost said fantastic. And I stopped myself from saying fantastic just now. You can’t say it too many times. Yeah.

Adrien Benoit:

I would have looked at the whip around, but I was already established with Fleetio before Whip Around was introduced. And whenever you start to implement a lot of things into a company, you try to find things that flow together. The Fleetio has a pre-trip and post-trip as well, where you can go in and modify it and things like that. And the drivers have an opportunity to create a work order on a truck and the mechanics see it. So it was just a flow in our company that worked really well for us.

Shelli Hawkins:

Perfect. And it’s all about finding out what works best for you.

Adrien Benoit:

It is. It is. What makes our life easier.

Laura Dolan:

Well, Adrien, I want to switch gears a little bit because one of the main reasons why I was excited to talk to you about today was I know your company recently survived a hurricane. I would like to know what you did to prepare for it, how did you rebuild afterwards, and what changes you made to your business. If you could please tell us that story, if you don’t mind going into the details of that.

Adrien Benoit:

You want to talk about round one or round two?

Laura Dolan:

Oh gosh.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yeah. I was like, I think that there was round one and round two. Yeah, let’s start with round one.

Laura Dolan:

Both. Why not?

Shelli Hawkins:

For sure.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, so that was probably one of the wildest times in our life. So if you guys remember back in the year 2005, we got hit by two hurricanes in our area. So the first one hit New Orleans and that was Hurricane Katrina. Not long after that we got hit, direct hit right here in Lake Charles by a hurricane called Rita. It was pretty bad. We didn’t get as much attention because of all the stuff going on in New Orleans with the flooding and the rescues going on over there. So Rita hit us pretty hard, but I was still pretty young when that happened, right? I was 20, 21, 20 years old, didn’t have the near amount of worries and stuff that I have today. And it was 2020 that Laura hit and-

Laura Dolan:

Sorry.

Adrien Benoit:

Right, you took us out.

Laura Dolan:

I’ve been apologizing all over the place for that, but please go on.

Adrien Benoit:

So it was almost to the fact that we nearly forgot about how much devastation a hurricane can cause. We did do preparation for the hurricane as normal. We put all of our trucks in two of our big buildings to keep them safe. We told employees to get out of town, go find a safe place to stay. Far from here. I remember staying real late for Hurricane Laura. I was in a truck. The police departments were still trying to get things cleared up. There was accidents happening. I stayed late. Me and one of my other guys, I believe…

No, two of my other guys, we stayed late and we helped the police departments get the wrecks cleaned up, make sure the roads were staying open, things like that. And then luckily my wife, she was at home getting all of our stuff packed up with my three kids. We evacuated, and I had a couple of guys that stayed here in town, but we evacuated. We went to Denham Springs, Louisiana, which is about two, two and a half hours from us. And we watched the weather as long as we could. Stayed up pretty much all night. I guess about one or two o’clock in the morning, one of my drivers calls me, he is like, “My house has fallen down.”

Laura Dolan:

Oh no.

Adrien Benoit:

I wasn’t laughing at the time about it. I wasn’t laughing at the time about it. But today, it’s funny. I told all my guys to get out of town and I had a couple of guys that are just warriors. They’re not leaving. They think they’re going to strap their house down while the storm’s passing through. I guess. I try to tell them that we can rebuild. You can’t save anything while the storm’s passing through. But he called me, he is like, “I got to get in my truck and I got to leave.” I’m like, “No, you got to stay where you’re at. Nobody can come help you. Nobody’s going to try and get out there and rescue you and this stay exactly where you at, just hunkered down in a corner in the bathroom or somewhere.”

So the next day we got up, it was pretty early, I think we got up probably around six to try and head back towards home. And the winds were still real bad. And we’re in the motor home, and I think I’m holding the steering wheel, felt like at a 45 while I’m driving back because the winds were so bad. And we get back and it is just total devastation. It just jaw-dropping. As soon as we started getting probably about 15 miles out, it’s just jaw-dropping. You see mobile homes flipped over. You see trees uprooted, and as you start to get closer, you just see sheds demolished. It was bad. So as we’re coming in, we’re fighting trees all down in the roadways, trying to get back to home. We finally make it back home and everything there, it was manageable. We had to tarp the roof. We had to do a few things, but we had a generator on the house luckily. So we got that running, got the family secured, and then we went to check out the office. And our office had got pretty demolished.

The roof got ripped off of it. It rained all inside of it. Water was just all over the floor, all the computers, all the printers, all the software inside the building was heavily impacted. So that was pretty tough there. So then we started getting some employees back and letting them get to their homes, check them out. The next couple of days, we revamped everything. So our towing software was down. We didn’t have internet in the area. We didn’t have electricity. So dispatching was right back to the Stone Age, pencil, paper-

Laura Dolan:

Pen and paper.

Adrien Benoit:

Paper. Yeah. Cellphones. And that was probably one of the toughest. Our phones were just ringing off the hook, but we couldn’t service our customers as we wanted to. We had to let our employees get back to their homes, take care of their problems. So whenever a lot of companies, or I say a lot of people complain about towing companies coming into your area after a storm, I thought it was amazing. All the companies that came in to help. Because we couldn’t do anything here. We were pretty vulnerable for several weeks.

I think it took us probably a week and a half to get back on our feet and really start running calls again. So that was fun. One of the things that was the toughest was our towing software. Again, it was InTow then, but it’s not an internet-based software, so it was just housed in the office. So that made it extremely tough to get it back up and going and all the data. So we’re working through that. We’re working long hours, working sun up to sun down, servicing the area, moving generators, getting things in place, trying to help out everybody that we can. Six weeks later, another storm rolls through.

Laura Dolan:

Oh, geez.

Adrien Benoit:

And this was Hurricane Delta.

Shelli Hawkins:

So way back in 2005 was Rita, and then you had Laura, and now you have Delta.

Laura Dolan:

They also had Katrina.

Shelli Hawkins:

And Katrina.

Laura Dolan:

Yeah.

Adrien Benoit:

So Katrina hit. Yeah, Katrina hit three hours away.

Laura Dolan:

But still, that was like a category five. I’m sure it affected you.

Adrien Benoit:

Slightly. Not like Laura and Delta, because Laura and Delta… Laura was a direct hit to Lake Charles, and then Delta followed right behind the same path, and it was another direct hit to Lake Charles. So for Delta, we had a different strategy. We had a different game plan. So the sheds that we put our trucks in, they were pretty much destroyed from Hurricane Laura. So we told all of our employees, “Hey, we booked a lot of rooms over in Houston, Texas. I want everybody to get their families, get the tow trucks. I want you all to go to these hotel rooms and don’t go back until we call you.”

So we put everybody up, the company paid for it. We made sure everybody was safe. Because there was really no safe place to stay in Lake Charles. Everything was already damaged from Laura. So we left again. We stayed late again working. Stayed late working again, trying to get the roadways cleaned. And it was [wild]. We left and as soon as we left and we got pretty close to Houston, the police department’s calling me, they got a rolled over 18 wheeler in the middle of the interstate blocking it. And I’m like, “Dude, we’re gone. We’re not coming back. The storm’s getting closer. If we come back now, there’s no way we’re getting out of there in time.”

So they took one of their big SWAT vehicles and they drove that thing off the road to get the interstate open. So this time it was a different strategy. We were a little more prepared. So we got our employees out of there. We got them into a safe area, and we didn’t respond back until the next day. So when we responded back the next day, we came back to a couple of 18 wheelers flipped over on the interstate, blocking the bridge. Yep. There was a lot of stuff… But it wasn’t as hard to come back this time. I think we were all numb to the fact that everything was tore up. It was in a lot worse shape when we left, because we started making some repairs. All the tarps that we put on the roofs were ripped off. But it just wasn’t as devastating as Laura.

Laura Dolan:

How many months apart did those hit? Or how many weeks? How long was it?

Adrien Benoit:

Six weeks.

Laura Dolan:

Oh wow. So you were probably-

Adrien Benoit:

Six weeks apart.

Laura Dolan:

… just getting back on your feet and then bam.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah.

Laura Dolan:

Packs another punch.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, that’s exactly right. We just started getting back on our feet, getting operations going really good, and just got our towing software up again, not long before that. So you should have seen me. I had all the servers and all the computer software and stuff in a crate, and I was taking it out of the office again, and I was loading it into the motorhome and plugging everything in the battery backups and taking it with me on the road this time. So it was pretty funny.

Laura Dolan:

That was smart.

Adrien Benoit:

So we learned a lot. The first one, it was bad. And the second one, we learned a lot from the first one to prepare us for the second one right away.

Shelli Hawkins:

Yeah. Have you done anything structurally to your property?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, we sure have. So the existing property where the building was, we had a lot of restrictions from the city on what we had to do to build it back up, so it didn’t make sense. So we had bought some property that was right behind us and we built a new facility on that property. And then we combined the two, which gives us now a nine acre facility in the Lake Charles location. Yes.

Shelli Hawkins:

Wow. We’d love to see some pictures of it. I’m sure it’s epic. Did you build up the property so it’s like above a certain level so it would not be susceptible to flooding?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, so there was a lot of requirements we had to meet to do this. One thing to meet FEMA regulations guidelines on the elevation. We had to build the property up five foot where the building was going to be, which was… Yeah, that’s astronomical. And then we had to build some retention area to hold watershed. So we had to do a lot of things. It took us about two and a half years to finally complete our project. It was tough.

Laura Dolan:

And I know you salvaged what you could of the software and had to get the software back up and running, but can you imagine how much worse that would have been if your files were not saved as data? They were saved as physical documents in a box that are now destroyed by water or any other type of devastation from the hurricane, and all that is lost? At least were you able to retrieve everything once everything was back up and running as far as your data and things like that?

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. Were able to retrieve all of our data from the software. So that was… Yeah, you’re right. If we had to go through and we had lost all that paperwork, man, that would have been tough. You have customers that you bill out that have accounts with you, all that paperwork would have been lost. So trying to figure all that out would have been a nightmare. So yeah, thank gosh for digital dispatch age. Right?

Laura Dolan:

Right. Makes all the difference.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. So yeah, we got to rebuild our facility. We are working in it now, so we moved into it September of 2023.

Laura Dolan:

Nice.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, it was awesome. We kind of got to design the whole building, the whole layout, exactly how we thought it would effectively work in our business. And we have a nice big dispatch area. We have a loading dock, we have several offices, a conference room. It’s nice to be able to be in an environment where you can work freely. It’s absolutely amazing. And we haven’t found an area where we didn’t like what we did.

Shelli Hawkins:

That is so reassuring.

Laura Dolan:

That’s great. And like Shelli said, send us some pictures if you want to. We would love to include them in the podcast transcription so that our audience can see all the changes and improvements that you made to your facility. That sounds great.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah. Yeah. One main thing we did was we put our towing software on a cloud server now so we can access it from anywhere.

Laura Dolan:

There you go.

Shelli Hawkins:

Outstanding.

Adrien Benoit:

Yeah, that was one of the most important things that we had accomplished.

Shelli Hawkins:

That is great.

Laura Dolan:

Adrien, thank you so much again for your time today. How can our audience find you? Are you on social media?

Adrien Benoit:

Yes, I’m on social media. I’m still new to all that kind of stuff of how all that works, but yeah, you can look me up on social media. Adrien Benoit on Facebook. I think we have a TikTok, Elite Wrecker LLC, I believe it is. You can email me. That’s adrien, A-D-R-I-E-N@elitewrecker.com, or you can give my office a call (337-433-3548) and they’ll transfer you right over to me.

Laura Dolan:

Excellent. I see your website actually has a lot of your social media icons on there, so I’ll make sure to link all of that in the transcription as well.

Elite Wrecker Facebook

Elite Wrecker Twitter/X

Elite Wrecker Instagram

Elite Wrecker Pinterest

Elite Wrecker YouTube

Just one last question, Adrien, what does the future look like for Elite Towing? Are you planning on expanding anytime soon? I know you just finished redoing your facilities from the hurricane, but any future plans to expand into different areas of Louisiana?

Adrien Benoit:

So at this time, we don’t have any plans to expand any farther into Louisiana. We do want to continue our growth here in Lake Charles and the Sulphur area. We do feel like there’s still opportunity for us to get out there and grow in this area. So we’re going to focus on that and try not to grow too fast. We’re going to try to make sure that we keep our quality control, our quality of service, because that’s really what we built the company on. So we don’t want to lose that by trying to branch out and grow too fast.

Laura Dolan:

I love that. That’s smart. You just got to grow at scale. That’s great.

Shelli Hawkins:

Thank you for your wise words today. We appreciate it.

Adrien Benoit:

Thank you all so much for having me today.

Laura Dolan:

Absolutely. We really appreciate your time, Adrien. Thank you so much. And thank you all so much for tuning into this episode of TRAXERO On-The-Go. We will see you next time.

Laura Dolan:

Thank you for listening to this episode of the TRAXERO On-The-Go podcast. For more episodes, go to traxero.com/podcast and to find out more about how we can hook your towing business up with our towing management software and impound yard solutions, please visit traxero.com or go to the contact page linked at the bottom of this podcast blog.

Music by AlexGrohl from Pixabay